The saviour of the British economy?

A safe pair of hands. Over and over again, British media outlets have used these words to describe Theresa May, the new Prime Minister. She is said to be stable and reliable, and yes, a bit boring. But maybe that’s exactly what the country needs now, after all the excitement that her predecessor David Cameron provided the UK with.

Similar things are being said about Theresa May’s new chancellor, Philip Hammond. The 60-year old has already held several ministerial posts – he was Foreign and Defence Secretary, among others – and has, contrary to many of his colleagues in the House of Commons, had a “real” job before becoming a Member of Parliament 19 years ago. After his studies at Oxford University, Hammond worked for a company that sells medical appliances, spent some time in South America as a consultant for the World Bank and became a partner at a consultancy firm.

Prior to the British EU-referendum on the 23rd of June, Hammond was part of the Remain-camp. It is expected that he will try to negotiate a deal under which the City of London can maintain its passporting rights into Europe, a crucial factor for London to keep its status as Europe’s leading financial center. At the same time, the Conservative will have to stabilise the British economy and regain trust from international investors. Thanks to its high budget and current account deficit, Britain will continue to rely on foreign funding – even more so, should there be a sharp recession looming.

Philip Hammond has had an eye out for the prestigious role for a while. Already in 2010, when the Conservatives formed a government with the Liberal Democrats, the man with the grey mane uttered his interest for the role as a Chief Secretary in Her Majesty’s Treasury, the second most important job after that of the Minister. However, at that point in time, a Liberal got the chance.

Thus, Hammond started in the Department of Transport before becoming Defence Secretary in 2011 and Foreign Secretary in 2014. A Member of Parliament, Hammond has represented Runnymede and Weybridge since 1997 – a constituency that voted Leave although their MEP supported Britain to remain in the EU.

Philip Hammond will now have to make use of his vast experience in order to reassure international investors that the UK is still a good destination for their money. “We don`t turn our back against the world”, he said after his appointment. Hammond pledged to take “whatever measures” needed to help stabilise the economy and retain Britain as an attractive destination for firms to invest.

It remains to be seen what this means for his tax policies. On Thursday, Hammond declined to comment on the announcements made by his predecessor George Osborne to slash corporation tax to 15 percent. Hammond is known for his support for low taxes. Nevertheless, it is still too early to tell whether Hammond will engage in, as some critics such as Pascal Lamy, the former head of the WTO, have claimed, extensive tax dumping in order to keep companies from leaving the UK after the divorce from the EU.

There is more to watch out for. There are two areas where Hammond could clash with his new boss fairly soon. First, there is fiscal politics. Hammond has a reputation of being a “fiscal hawk”. Nevertheless, he cannot just continue what George Osborne started in 2010 when he embarked on a massive austerity program that still is not finished. Prime Minister May has been very clear in the past days that the government’s first goal should not be – as planned before – to generate a budget surplus by 2020 but to make sure that more people benefit from economic growth and prosperity (assuming, of course, there is still something left to share after Brexit).

We might get a first glance of his fiscal plans when he presents the Autumn Statement in November. Different to what then chancellor George Osborne announced before the referendum, there won’t be an emergency budget. Experts like Kallum Pickering, the UK economist at Berenberg Bank, thus expect some more fiscal loosening in the short run whilst more cuts are being postponed towards the end of the Parliament.

Besides fiscal policy, there is a second topic that holds vast potential for conflict, the so called passport for the City of London. This framework allows banks headquartered in London to sell their products on the continent. Should the City of London lose these rights, several thousand jobs could be moved to Frankfurt, Paris or Dublin. London would subsequently lose some of its attractiveness for international banks. Hammond seems to be all too aware of this. On Tuesday, he stated at the British Bankers Association that the financial industry will be possibly hit the hardest by Brexit. “I know and understand the importance of passporting”, Hammond said.

Theresa May though not only needs to satisfy the banks, but also those 17 million Brexit-voters of which many requested the European Freedom of Labour Movement to be scrapped or at least reduced. Leading EU-politicians such as Jean-Claude Juncker, the President of the European Commission, or Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, have already made clear that there is not too much room for negotiation here. Access to the Single Market and passporting can only be sustained if the four freedoms remain in place. So where will that leave the two safe pairs of hands?