May and Merkel – will they get along?

The parallels are all too obvious. They are both females, in their late fifties or early sixties. They are both pastors’ daughters. They both studied untypical subjects (geography and physics). They are both known for being practical, having a strong endurance and, paying attention to details. In addition to all of this, they have fought their way to the top by beating the competition (mostly men) and by making sure that there is actually not too much competition left to challenge them in the future (Merkel has killed off all critics in her party while May was the last Tory-woman standing after a bruising Referendum campaign).

Both are known to be hard workers. Both have the reputation of wanting to get things done and, of just getting on with it, as people say here in Britain. Both Merkel, the German chancellor, as well as May, Britain’s new Prime Minister, have been around for a while (Merkel since 2005, May since 2010). Both are said to be a “safe pair of hands”, a safe bet. Neither of the two has the reputation of being too emotional, chatty, charming, or anything but business.

So, the question goes, will they get along, the German chancellor and her British counterpart? For sure, the relationship between Merkel and May will be crucial when negotiating Britain’s exit from the EU. Both will be studying each others previous negotiating quite closely, and they will be trying to predict the future by investigating the other’s past behaviour in negotiations where a lot was at stake.

From a German point of view, out of the two choices at hand – Theresa May and Andrea Leadsom – May is definitely the preferred option. This is not so much because she was a soft Remainer, but rather because she is expected to behave fairly rationally, pragmatically and reasonably. That’s not to say that Merkel and others should not expect some tough negotiating. Theresa May will, and I am sure that people in Berlin and Brussels will be aware of this, fight as hard as she can to get “the best deal for Britain”.

A lot will depend on the careful calibration of this relationship. Merkel might help May where other European partners don’t want to. But, as the leading representative of one of the most important trading partners of the UK, she can also play a huge role in massaging May into the desired direction.

As to the end result, I am not sure whether it makes a huge difference whether the two get along well, given the gigantic task that lies ahead of them. There is a fundamental issue here that needs to be resolved but that at the same time seems totally unresolveable. How do you keep full access to the Single Market if you plan to reduce the European Freedom of (Labour) Movement? Any negotiator will have to be very witty to achieve anything that comes close to this.

Depending on how the coming months unfold, Merkel could become May’s interconnector into Brussels and other European capitals. However, it could also be the contrary. Merkel might well become a strong adversary to May, should the British Prime Minister try to use the Europeans currently living in the UK as bargaining chips for the negotiations in Brussels.

However, we should not overplay the importance of the relationship between the two. Germany and the UK no longer have closely aligned interests (at least not as aligned as before June 23rd) and so each side will fight with might for what they want to get out of this situation.

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